Thursday – November 10th

7:00 AM
Registration | Location: Knicely West Lobby
8:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Breakfast | Location: Ballroom
9:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Keynote: Betina Gardner| Location: Ballroom
Betina Gardner

Two Sides of the Same Coin: Designing IT and Library Services for Everyone
Learn about Gardner’s experience – the challenges and the rewards – as CIO and Dean of Libraries.
More…

10:45 AM – 11:30 AM
Concurrent Sessions

Location: Room 138
Libraries
Creating Digital Badges to Enrich Your Library

Laura Bohuski – Western Kentucky University

This presentation will discuss how digital badges work and the ways they can be used to enhance different aspects within libraries. While Digital Badges have garnered interest in many fields, there is a belief that badges are solely for use within a classroom setting; however, this is not the case. Beyond the already proven use of badges in professional fields such as retail, badges can be used in a multitude of ways to enhance workflows, learning, and professional development within any library.

This presentation will also illustrate what a badge is through the examination of badge examples. The examples will include images of how the badge looks visually, both from a user’s perspective and from a creator’s perspective. This presentation will include some examples of how badges can be incorporated into situations within the library such as training and cross training, collaboration with outside departments, promotion of learning within the library, use within Information Literacy or Library Instruction classes, and/or professional development. The presentation will also walk through the creation of a badge (of the audience’s choosing) through the use of the badging system: badgelist.com.

Location: Room 163C
Instructional Design
Using A Class Project to Address the Web Design Needs of the Local Business Community

George Kontos – Western Kentucky University

A collaborative project is described. In this project, students in a web design class contacted local businesses and created web sites (collections of web pages) to benefit these businesses. Two phases of the project, planning and implementation, are described. The project, suitable for both online and face-to-face instruction, required that students keep a journal. The instructor did a follow-up investigation to assure that the websites that students created were indeed what the businesses asked for. In this presentation, the importance of training our students properly in web page design will be emphasized. Participants will learn how to help their students understand that the overall process of developing a web site is not just creating the web pages and linking them together. Good planning includes sketching the navigation structure of the web site and determining the content and navigation of each web page. In addition, keeping a journal of student-business meetings and interactions is important.

Ideally, participants should have some interest in teaching web design but anyone who wants to know how to help students work collaboratively with the community is welcome.

Location: Room 112
IT
There’s Gold in the Clickstream: Personalizing Learning with Real-Time Analytics

Virginia Lacefield – University of Kentucky

Modern learning environments incorporate numerous educational technology tools designed to aid student learning in and outside of traditional classrooms, but few integrate real-time clickstream data from learning systems with students’ external profile information and real-world behaviors. The goals of UK’s real-time learning analytics project include increasing student success through proactive and/or predictive interventions, particularly for underserved and at-risk populations; personalizing instructor/student interactions in large lecture courses; and contributing to collaborative development of industry standards in real-time analytics architecture through partnerships with the IMS Global Learning Consortium, Instructure, Echo360, and others. The information provided in this session will help IT professionals and educators consider the potential value of this type of system by facilitating discussion and idea-generation about how it could be used in their own institutions and classrooms. Following a short presentation on the architecture of UK’s learning analytics systems, we’ll run a mini “design jam” during which participants will break into small groups to create potential use cases appropriate for their institution, describe target students, select data for building appropriate message triggers, identify critical components of the personalized message, and consider strategies and challenges for assessing impacts of personalized messaging on student learning outcomes.

Location: Room 163A
Instructional Design
Keeping It Simple: Instructional Design & Quality Matters Practices at UofL

Linda Leake and Deb Hatfield – University of Louisville

Faculty are experts in their subject area, but may not be aware of factors that contribute to a well-designed online environment for their courses. In order to allow faculty to focus on the content, the University of Louisville developed a standardized course template to guide faculty in the structure and lay-out, as well as pre-populating the course with valuable content, such as university resources and policies. The template was specifically designed to follow Instructional Design Best Practices and Quality Matters principles, including “Keep It Simple” and “Ease of Use.” This presentation will include a discussion of the Quality Matters process and how the template’s layout and content contribute to a well-designed online environment.

Location: Room 208 I/J
IT
WKU’s Technology Resource Center – A place for teaching and learning about multimedia technology

Josh Marble and Julie Taylor – Western Kentucky University

Access to higher education can come in many forms. For some, it means being able to attend a face-to-face class. For others, it means being able to attend class online. Regardless of the delivery method, multimedia content has become instrumental in facilitating information in higher education. For more than a decade, WKU’s Technology Resource Center has been offering students, faculty, and staff access to A/V equipment, training, and a knowledgeable staff to assist with multimedia content. The TRC has been a huge success in fostering the development of multimedia content while easing the frustrations of those who do not have access to, nor know how to use video/audio gear. Let us show you how to better support your faculty, staff, and students with their multimedia needs.

Location: Room 113
Instructional Design
A Little Means a Lot: Simple Ways to Improve Online Course Accessibility

Jennifer Perkins – Eastern Kentucky University

Instructors, course designers, media specialists, and others in higher education repeatedly hear terms like accessibility, universal design, Section 508, and ADA. Unfortunately, they may not receive necessary training on these issues until an urgent need arises, leading to undue stress and frustration for everyone involved. In online courses, where most content is provided via HTML, video, and downloadable documents, content creators may be especially unfamiliar with making the information accessible to their full student audience. In this session, the presenter shares simple techniques that enhance online course accessibility. The techniques are easy to implement and require little or no background knowledge in coding (though attendees are preferably familiar with at least rudimentary HTML).

Location: Room 208 G/H
Sponsor
Effective Security

Steve Lange – Pomeroy

Today’s threat actors are more persistent and creative than ever. While anti-virus and firewalls are a good start, an effective information security program needs to be more sophisticated to protect your organization from threat actors’ intent on stealing sensitive data, causing disruption of services or hacktivism. Join Pomeroyand SecureWorks for our Beyond the Fundamentals Effective Security for Educational Institutions session. SecureWorks, a global organization that safeguards over 4,200 clients 24×7, will explain why effective security is adaptive security and how a strong cybersecurity program can help protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of sensitive data, respond to ever changing compliance regulations, and the importance of risk management.

Location: Room 163B
Sponsor
Blackboard Roadmap

Tammy Jolley – Bb Customer Success Advocate

Let’s explore recent releases and what’s coming soon to the Blackboard New Learning Experience products. The roadmap will feature Blackboard Learn, Collaborate, and Bb Mobile. We’ll also take a peek at the new Bb Predict and Bb Advise products, which promote student success and degree exploration/completion. Helpful user weblinks and user group opportunities will be provided.

11:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Networking Break | Location: West Lobby
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM
Concurrent Sessions

Location: Room 112
Instructional Design
Free and Easy Multimedia Creation

Beth Case and Jason Zahrndt – University of Louisville

Your faculty would love to incorporate multimedia into their courses, but it takes a lot of time, training, and expensive software, right? Wrong! Adobe has many free apps that run in a browser or on Apple and/or Android devices. We’ll show you how to make videos, edit photos, create narrated slide shows and more, all for free! It’s simple enough that you can easily show faculty how to create their own multimedia content.

Location: Room 138
Instructional Design
Let’s Talk Web Accessibility!

Marcy Dickson – Bluegrass Community & Technical College

Web accessibility is a very important topic in education; so why aren’t higher education educators and administration doing and bringing more awareness to it?! It’s a necessary piece to learning, not only for learners with disabilities, but it also helps to meet a variety of learning styles. This session will discuss a general view point from an instructional designer. Along with how instructional designers approach web accessibility and best practices in designing course content to ensure that learning is an inclusive learning environment whether teaching online or F2F.

Location: Room 163C
Instructional Design
Yes, It’s Free! Using Open Source Plugins to Create Accessible Video Players

Megan Jones – Eastern Kentucky University

A polished, accessible video player can provide cohesion and professionalism to online courses. At EKU, I have leveraged open-source software to develop an accessible, responsive video player interface comprising an HTML5 player, captioning capabilities, interactive transcript area, button to download transcripts, navigation via mouse or keyboard, screen reader capability (for the interface itself), and adaptive properties to fit different screen resolutions.

Such a video player interface addresses a gap that institutions have in providing video content to those with disabilities. Section 508 necessitates the use of captions for multimedia presentations, and interactive transcripts can only add benefits. Accessibility to those who can use only keyboard controls increases the audience size even more, and responsive properties allow the pages to adjust to nearly any device. I have also developed a form allowing anyone to generate HTML files compatible with the video source files on EKU servers. This “plug-and-play” solution will allow our staff to develop video player pages with minimal programming while ensuring data integrity. This presentation will excite and inspire any institution seeking to meet Section 508 standards and WCAG 2.0 guidelines in the area of online video.

Location: Room 113
Instructional Design
International Peer Mentoring

Donell Murray – Morehead State University

Kentucky state universities are looking for ways to increase enrollment and retention. One way is by developing an effective peer mentoring program for international students. This population has traditionally been underserved by universities, mainly because it wasn’t seen as necessary to encourage and equip American and international students’ interaction. With implementation, all newly enrolled international students will have the opportunity to adjust to campus life in regards to academic and social integration. The implementation consists of approximately 20 upper class students classified as mentors. Training is conducted the first week of the fall semester with each student receiving a training manual. When the international student comes to campus, International Student Services assigns the team to the student. E-mentoring by using social media and ejournaling will take place weekly, along with meeting the students for informal encounters.

Location: Room 208 I/J
Libraries
Bridging the Learning Divide: Technology + Universal Design = Student success

Rebecca Richardson – Murray State University

Universal design is a concept that attempts make the world equally accessible to everyone regardless of ability. This is a concept more accepted when dealing with students that have a visible disability, such as mobility or vision issues. However, students with invisible disabilities such as chronic health conditions, autism spectrum disorders, processing disorders, mental health issues, ADHD, and general learning disorders are becoming more and more detectable in our classrooms either through self-advocacy or through registering with a student disability office.

Students like these are becoming more apparent in classrooms across campus and can often be found in nearly every class taught by library faculty. The success of these students in higher education is often dependent on the willingness and ability of the instructor to make concessions and to provide lessons based on the universal design for learning. The question then begs, what can we do to help these students be successful? One way is to use technology as a tool to equalize learning. The librarians on our campus are often seen as the innovators of educational technology and we take the concept seriously. This interactive workshop will include hands on demonstrations of several computer apps / programs that I use which can assist both students and faculty in making the class successful whether in a “one-shot” instruction session or an organized “for credit” information literacy course.

Location: Room 163A
IT
As You Were – Extracting the Most Value From Business As Usual

Matt Varney – KCTCS

Higher Education relies heavily on enterprise content, corporate knowledge, and intellectual capital. Yet, having the right activities, business processes, and technology systems in place to ensure easier manageability and the greatest value of these assets generally ranks near the bottom of funding priorities – especially in these trying financial times. Most organizations recognize the strategic value represented with these, but few are in the position to put forth a large scale effort to implement the necessary technology controls. This, coupled with the serious and costly (in the short term) change management programs needed to ensure success, means that even more pressure is put on institutions to do more with less in every way. At KCTCS, we’re finding ways to increase the value of these strategic assets while simply encouraging work the way people normally work. Using all of the common tools for communication and collaboration, we are making business as usual work better for us because of the services and approaches used on the back end from Office 365. This session will describe how these services work and what we are doing to make sure they work for the business of operating our colleges and teaching our students.

Location: Room 163B
Sponsor
T.E.A.L. (Technology Enhanced Active Learning) Classrooms

Lisa Ratliff – Creative Image Technologies

Technology-Enhanced Active Learning classrooms are spaces that are specifically designed to facilitate active, collaborative learning activities. T.E.A.L. classrooms have round or D-shaped tables with dedicated LCD displays and built-in A/V support that allows flexible display of video at each table and around the room. These rooms are ideal for classes that are taught through hands-on, active learning and group activities, or “flipped classes,” in which lectures are recorded and watched outside of class, and class time is used for individual or group activities.

12:45 PM – 1:45 PM
Lunch | Location: Ballroom
1:45 PM – 2:30 PM
Concurrent Sessions

Location: Room 138
IT
AR and VR in Education: Going Beyond the Page

Paige Brooks-Jeffiers – KCTCS

If a picture is worth a thousand words, what would an interactive picture be worth? What about an entire interactive world where you can learn, play, and experiment in a safe environment? Student engagement is not only a 21st century buzz word, it is an important step in getting students to take on the responsibility of their own learning. Engaging students is not a new issue but, thanks to technology, there are now new ways to bring more engaging content to students – one example is through AR and VR. These new technologies are allowing students to get inside the content and learn from a different perspective – giving them a better understanding. Initial research is showing much improved engagement from the student’s perspective. Join us for some ideas on using AR and VR to go beyond the page and improve your student’s engagement.

Location: Room 163A
Instructional Design
Captioning Basics: Using YouTube Effectively

Beth Case – University of Louisville

Everyone agrees that it’s important to caption videos for accessibility, but many are overwhelmed by the idea of developing a comprehensive captioning process. This workshop doesn’t try to solve that problem! Instead, we’ll take one simple step and demonstrate how you can create high quality captions for your own YouTube videos. We’ll cover creating the transcript, how to break the text up into appropriate “chunks”, then uploading and synchronizing the transcript with the video. We will also share resources for other captioning scenarios, such as captioning someone else’s video or videos not on YouTube.

Location: Room 113
Instructional Design
Conversations in the Cloud

Mike Homan – University of Louisville

Linda Lambert said, “One good conversation can shift the direction of change forever.” Join us as we explore 5 “unique” UofL faculty approaches to facilitating discussion in their online classes, how their students respond, and what positive effects can occur. Regardless of the discipline, conversations (whether live or asynchronous) can be used in content delivery, assessment, as well as engagement. Cloud tools such as Voicethreads, lecture capture (“discussion capture,” in this case), social media, and others will be explored as we look at use cases at the university, as well as data which supports facilitating discussion in your classes.

Location: Room 208 I/J
Libraries
Notable Kentucky African Americans Database: 13 years and still growing

Reinette Jones, Edward Brown, and Rob Aken – University of Kentucky
Notable Kentucky African Americans Database [NKAA] @ http://nkaa.uky.edu

NKAA is based solely on the contributions and accomplishments of African Americans in Kentucky and from Kentucky. It is a grassroots, in-house, reference tool that was created as a webpage in 2003 at the University of Kentucky Libraries. It became a database in 2007. NKAA is 100% free to all who have access to the internet. No password. No ID. Available are over 3,000 entries about people, places, events, terms and definitions. Also included are over 3,400 sources that support the entries. NKAA receives about 250,000 hits each year from students, educators, genealogist, and the curious from all over the world. In 2009, the American Library Association awarded the NKAA Database the RUSA/GALE Cengage Learning Award for Excellence in Reference and Adult Library Services. NKAA is managed by one main librarian/researcher, with key support and editing from a second librarian, and with ongoing technical support from a member of the library IT staff. The database is a low maintenance, heavily used resource that is updated every other day, if not every day. Contributions come from reference questions, submissions from researchers on campus and at other institutions, and suggestions from the general public at large. The major return of the NKAA Database is much more knowledge in the classroom and within publications about African Americans in and from Kentucky. NKAA is one of a kind.

Location: Room 163C
Instructional Design
Using Technology and Best Teaching Practices to Increase the Quality of Online Classes

George Kontos – Western Kentucky University

Tools like Twitter, Facebook, and wikis are essential in today’s technological world as are other newer tools that hold promise. Whatever tools we want to use in our classroom we will have to be careful how and to what extent we want to use them. It might be best to consider using them in conjunction with well-established teaching principles such as the seven principles for good practice developed by Chickering and Gamson in 1987. This presentation will describe the above principles and will discuss how they can be implemented in an online computer class.

Location: Room 112
Instructional Design
Expanding the Service Learning Scholars Program

Roger Weis – Murray State University

Too often, students continue to be inundated with lectures, tests and papers without any “real world” experiences. Service learning combines community engagement with at least one learning objective. Murray State University, borrowing from an existing program at the University of Utah, created a Service Learning Scholars program in which students may be designated an SL Scholar upon graduation by taking a certain number of SL designated classes and maintaining a specific grade point average. Since, the SL classes have grown exponentially and are highly sought after by students; a great recruiting tool as well as being valuable for students and the community.

Location: Room 163B
Sponsor
Learn how the Mediasite Video Platform increases student engagement and offers schools a streamlined and unified solution for creation and management of all their academic video.

Dan Wabiszewski and Chris Mann – Sonic Foundry, Inc.

Video has become a central part of teaching, learning and communication. Rich media plays a huge role in how the 21st century student learns. Schools are seeing a dramatic increase in the demand for video from student, faculty and staff. Sonic Foundry’s Mediasite Video Platform offers a suite of tools for video creation and content management that are cost effective and robust. Users can easily import video recorded with any device, user-generated content and web conferences into the Mediasite Video Platform. Students are able to find and watch important video content with one click, using our Smartsearch optical character recognition that auto-scans and indexes all recognizable text found in video and content PowerPoint slides, saving them valuable time.

2:45 PM – 3:30 PM
Concurrent Sessions

Location: Room 163A
Libraries
Think Local: Delivering Higher Ed Scholarship to Area High Schools with an Institutional Repository

A.J. Boston – Murray State University

A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. While institutional repositories make the scholarly work of your institution’s students and faculty available half a world away, reliance on this global potential may be too narrow a publicizing strategy for both your repository and the content it manages. Instead, focus your active outreach to a hundred mile radius or so. By delivering your world-class product to the students and teachers in the high school just down the road, you can achieve tangible results from which your library, your university, and your community may directly benefit.

Scholarly Communication Librarian A.J. Boston discusses the benefits experienced from publicizing the Murray State University IR to a local audience. Session members will discuss collections housed by their own libraries and how they are (or could be) used by local high schools or other non-academic local communities. Methods and strategies for these types of outreach efforts will also be think-tanked. Participants should leave this session with the kernel of a plan to spread world-class scholarship to their local high school classroom.

Location: Room 163C
Instructional Design
Don’t Worry, Be Appy

Beth Case and Jason Zahrndt – University of Louisville

As digital natives, students today are constantly plugged in to their ubiquitous smart phones and other digital devices. You may be wondering how you can leverage these tools, especially mobile apps, to assist faculty promote student learning, engagement, and productivity. Join us to learn how mobile apps can be used to change the way we reach and teach faculty to reach and teach students. We’ll share some of our favorite apps from Android and iOS, and you in the audience will have a chance to share your favorite apps as well.

Location: Room 138
Instructional Design
Hello Canvas

Kelley Cruse, Patsy Carruthers, and Buddy Hall – University of Kentucky

After 15 years of using Blackboard as our Learning Management System, the University of Kentucky decided to go in a different direction. During this session, we will share the university’s decision making process, the timeline and support plan and our lessons learned during our transition to Instructure’s Canvas.

Location: Room 113
Instructional Design
SIPX: The Accessible Coursepack Solution

Ashley Ireland and Cris Ferguson – Murray State University

This presentation will explore the implementation of SIPX at Murray State University. SIPX is a solution for embedding digital course materials into the campus LMS in order to maximize library resources, comply with copyright guidelines, and to introduce open access educational resources. This system allows for instructors to select resources that reflect the most cost-effective, highest educational impact resources that are available, and for students to pay for resources as they are used, rather than in entirety at the beginning of the course. SIPX, a Proquest company, provides a wealth of analytics for instructors and administrators. The presenters will discuss the problems solved by this solution, as well as implementation specifics, such as integrating with our payment management system.

Location: Room 208 I/J
IT
Internal Phishing Campaign

Brian Purcell and Duane Dycus – Murray State University

The MSU Information Security team conducted a internal phishing campaign as a training exercise for all employees. This presentation outlines how the campaign was conducted and the benefits of this type of “real-world” education. Our findings were surprising and concerning.

Location: Room 112
Instructional Design
Motivated Design

Mikah Pritchard – Eastern Kentucky University

Everyone is motivated. The question is, “What do you want students to be motivated to do?” As Faculty and Instructional Designers, we may be tasked with delivering information to students through an online platform. The types of activities we develop and the way students interact within the online environment matters. Do you provide students with opportunities to connect with peers? Do you utilize extra credit points as incentives? Do you know what your students expect to learn from the course before beginning? Do you consider your students when setting up due dates or opening a module? All of these questions have a motivational basis. This presentation will run through the most popular motivation theories and how they can be leveraged within your course to foster student motivation. Specific learning theories reviewed will include: Behaviorism, Self-determination Theory, Expectancy Value Theory, and Social Cognitive Theory. Recommended approaches will be incorporated into the presentation delivery, so be ready to engage!

Location: Room 163B
Sponsor
Managed and Hosted IT Services from CBTS

Brian Gregg and Brent Flaugher – Cincinnati Bell Telephone Service
Chris Howes and Steve Richmond – Morehead State University
Kenneth Burdine – KCTCS

This presentation will discuss the services being provided by CBTS to Morehead State University and KCTCS related to voice, data, wireless, and security which enhance different aspects within the campus sites academic and residence halls services. The presentation will include input from MSU and KCTCS as to why they have taken the paths they have taken, the advantages, and the benefits. This presentation will also illustrate how CBTS delivers services just in time for your needs and how you may be able to take advantage of these within your institution. This presentation will include some examples specifically at MSU and KCTCS that are practical and informative.

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Networking Break | Location: West Lobby
4:00 PM – 4:45 PM
Concurrent Session

Location: Room 138
IT
Empowering Your Blackboard Users

Kaliegh Belda and Shawn Brewer – Western Kentucky University

Western Kentucky University has been supporting Blackboard since 1998. From the early days of a one-person help desk dedicated to Blackboard support to a centralized IT Helpdesk that fields thousands of calls per semester, learn how WKU handles Blackboard user support, and the many avenues we provide for both personalized service and on-demand resources.

Location: Room 163C
Instructional Design
Stop! Collaborate and Listen

Paige Brooks-Jeffiers – KCTCS

Using Bb Collaborate Ultra, including closed captioning, for effective online meetings and courses.

Location: Room 113
Instructional Design
VR U R <3 Virtual Reality Impact on Libraries

Chris Bryant – Western Kentucky University

Virtual Reality (VR) is at the forefront of how users in the future will interact with each other and technology. Can and should VR and video games play a vital role in the way that professors, librarians, faculty and staff interact with students?
Several major university and colleges have emerging eSport programs; Robert Morris University in Chicago, University of Pikeville in Kentucky, Maryville University in St. Louis, and Southwestern University offer scholarships for cyber athletes. Video games that are popular for play include LOL (League of Legends), DOTA2 (Defense of the Ancients), and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive to name a few. This type of activity and entertainment will increase in the coming years. How can the higher education environment use this resource of evolving technology to better understand and serve our students? Students that may be in a fixed location, serving in a war zone, physically disabled, or simply prefer not to learn on their terms can benefit from this technology. What resources can be provided for these types of students and what type of resources will be needed for the future cyber/online enhanced students?

Location: Room 112
Libraries
Top Ten: A discussion of Ten Things Academic Librarians Do That Create Inadvertent Barriers to Access and Overcoming Them

Jeff Henry, Rebecca Richardson, and A. J. Boston – Murray State University

QR codes – We librarians love them, but do students use them? MLIS jargon – It’s correct, but does it aid an Econ or Nursing students understanding of searching a database? Who doesn’t love the look and feel of a real bound volumes or the printed page? The student 75 miles away from campus, that’s who. In order to move forward with making libraries and information literacy concepts more accessible, we must first identify the follies that can occur in academic libraries that may hinder accessibility for specific student populations. In this session, we’ll count down a top ten list of things we librarians do in our collections, reference, building layout, and instruction that, while well-meaning, tend to actually decrease accessibility for specific student populations. We will lead a discussion that highlights examples for each of these ten no-no’s, and solicit practical solutions and workarounds to mitigate their hindering effects. We will also encourage participants to identify practices that they feel discourage accessibility and kick start a discussion to identify solutions.

Location: Room 208 I/J
Instructional Design
Using Free Online Tools to Create Content and Enhance Instruction

Melony Shemberger – Murray State University

This presentation will feature select free — and fun — web-based tools that can help students grasp concepts more effectively by creating meaningful content. A couple of these tools will include Piktochart and Padlet, along with others. Participants will be shown how the tools can be incorporated into lessons. These tools are applicable for online or on-site courses. Links to the tools, sample assignments and instructions will be made available to session participants.

Location: Room 163B
Sponsor
Samsung 837 and Converging Technology

Chris Johnson – Diversified

It’s not a store. It’s not a showroom. It’s not a museum. It’s Samsung 837. Diversified manages one of the world’s 16 18 KYCC2016 most integrated IT and Digital Content Playgrounds. Chris Johnson, CTO at Diversified, will take you on a tour of the fully integrated digital property. The convergence of IT and IoT.

6:30 PM – 9:00 PM
Reception | Location: Ballroom